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Introduction

Market position statements are a crucial part within the relationship between local authorities and the care and support sector. The aim of the market position statement is to understand the current market for adult care services and to identify future demand in the context of changing expectations and different models of service delivery.

Commissioners alongside providers and communities need to understand the difference between supply, availability, demand and quality compared with ‘what good looks like’ to respond to what is needed.

The COVID19 pandemic has brought about significant change in the care sector over a very short period of time – it is fair to say this has been unprecedented in modern times. It does, however, afford us the opportunity to reflect on what is done, why and how.

There is now a chance to co-produce options based on new ideas of what can work. These need to address equality and access issues particularly where there has been under-representation of some groups. Providers may have proposals for development and innovative approaches, there may also be wider strategic opportunities to embed effective approaches.

These are some of the reasons why the Tees Valley local authorities are working collaboratively in the production of their market position statements. The intention is to set out, through market facilitation and commissioning activity, the vision for adult social care activity across the Tees Valley in a period of significant change in terms of the way public services are delivered.

The Tees Valley local authorities wish to be forward thinking and outward looking in their business planning hence the creation of a self- service tool where providers can view data in a comparable format having the ability to break down the data as they deem fit.

Each section below has text from the participating authorities in separate tabs so you can quickly and easily obtain relevant information across the Tees Valley area. Wherever possible, interactive data tools have been provided that allow you to discover key insights across a range of topics.

Please Note: Each data tool is independent from the others, and from the tabbed text. You must choose appropriate filters in each tool, including which authorities you wish to view.

The intention of this Market Position Statement is to clearly set out how, through market facilitation and commissioning activity the vision for Darlington can be realised, not only through the delivery of care and support services, but also in the way in which health and social care partners actively contribute towards economic growth and employment opportunities for the people of Darlington.

The ongoing direction of travel which will continue to shape delivery of adult social care services is set out in this Market Position Statement. As such, it has been informed by and builds on Darlington’s Health and Wellbeing Strategy, which provides strategic direction for decision makers in local health and social care services based on challenges identified in the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA). These documents can be found on the Councils website – www.darlington.gov.uk

Like many other Councils, Darlington is in a period of significant change in terms of the way public services are delivered. Citizens’ expectations have changed, different models of service delivery have or must be developed, there have been significant technological advances, and Councils are experiencing unprecedented financial pressures as a result of the national austerity measures. These factors have and will continue to result in a change to the market landscape.

In this context, we see this Market Position Statement as an increasingly vital part of our relationship with the care and support sector. It aims to: build on the local strategic approach and long-term vision for the future of public services in Darlington; explain what new approaches and services are needed, and encourage our partners to help us shape a sustainable model of care which achieves better health and wellbeing outcomes for local people.

The aim of this Market Position Statement is to understand the current market for adult services and to identify future demand for services. It is our intention that this document acts as a starting point for meaningful discussions between the Council and providers and potential providers of services to ensure that we can collectively meet need.

Under the Care Act 2014 the council has a statutory duty to provide care and support for people with eligible needs. The Act also places a duty on the council to maintain an efficient and effective care market to meet the needs of the residents in Hartlepool.

The aim of this Market Position Statement is to understand the current market for adult services and to identify future demand for services. It is our intention that this document acts as a starting point for meaningful discussions between the council and providers and potential providers of services to ensure that we can collectively meet need.

This Market Position Statement provides a range of information for stakeholders to enable them to understand the population of Middlesbrough and its care and support needs.

The information is presented in a way that enables stakeholders interrogate, analyse and interpret the information, encouraging innovation to meet needs and enabling stakeholders to participate in the realisation of Middlesbrough’s vision for the future. This data is currently available up to the start of the COVID 19 Pandemic, This position statement is intended to be updated regularly, data relating to the outbreak and beyond will be updated in due course

The pandemic has had a significant effect on the population of the country as a whole and particularly on vulnerable people. It is therefore impossible, at this time, to base future needs for services on the service usage prior to this pandemic. We anticipate that what individuals and families want from services may change and services themselves will need to move with and adapt to changing guidance.

Middlesbrough has a strong ambition to improve the lives of Middlesbrough residents, with community engagement being a key priority. The Council wants to work with its communities and partners to improve health and wellbeing, create opportunities for local people, improve its housing and infrastructure and make the town attractive to residents and visitors.

We want to promote independence and develop evidence based early interventions to prevent peoples care needs or to meet these needs where prevention isn’t possible.  Our future commissioning aims will therefore focus on:

  • working with partners to devise and develop new delivery models,
  • developing integrated commissioning models,
  • developing holistic, evidence based early interventions,
  • Ensuring we use limited resources effectively

Achieving these aims in emerging, but likely to be challenging financial circumstances, which will require us to continue to make savings, requires us to place a much greater emphasis on treating public spending as an investment, supporting the local economy and generating returns which can be reinvested.

To do this we want to develop and improve our communication with partners, encouraging creativity and innovation, sharing ideas and best practice and engaging with our communities to better understand what local people want from services.

We welcome approaches from providers who want to discuss bringing new and innovative approaches to meeting needs in what could be “the new normal”.

The Market Position Statement (MPS) provides intelligence to providers on current and future supply and demand across the whole spectrum of the Adult Social Care market. The MPS aims to enable providers to make proactive business and investment decisions and to be responsive to Local Authority commissioning intentions. It also outlines support available to providers to assist in their development.

This new flexible tool allows potential providers, to manipulate data for analysis, to provide the required information which is part of a central approach where the Local Authority becomes a market facilitator rather than a just a procurer of services. 

We need to work in partnership to fully understand the position of the current market and the effect the Covid-19 Pandemic has both now and in the future.

We recognise that providers are an important source of intelligence, in relation to the size and characteristics of our local market and that, by sharing market intelligence and working together we can provide better quality and choice. It is hoped that providers will be encouraged to respond to future demand, with new and innovative ideas on how maintain a vibrant and stable market.

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Darlington Borough Council’s future commissioning aims and vision will be focused on changing behaviours to promote independence developing evidence based early interventions to prevent peoples care needs increasing and devising new delivery models through joint work with our partners.

We will achieve this through a particular focus on using available resources more effectively and seeking to work with a more diverse range of partners including voluntary and community sector organisations small and medium size enterprises and entrepreneurs. This position statement is intended to provide the information needed to support that effort.

Hartlepool Borough Council and its partners through the Health and Wellbeing Board have the following vision and ambition:

Our vision is that Hartlepool will develop a culture and environment that promotes and supports health and wellbeing for all. 

Our ambitions are:

Living Well –Hartlepool is a safe and healthy place to live with strong communities. Enabling those who live in Hartlepool to be healthy and well for a lifetime involves much more than good health and social care services. Many different things impact on health and wellbeing – housing, jobs, leisure, sport & access to open spaces, education, health services and transport.  We want Hartlepool to be a healthy place with supportive neighbourhoods and communities which are strong and resourceful, making best use of their community assets. We want to support people in Hartlepool to take steps to avoid premature deaths.

Ageing Well – Older People in Hartlepool live active and independent lives and are supported to manage their own health and wellbeing. Similar to most areas in England, the proportion of older people in Hartlepool is increasing. We want to support people to develop and maintain health and independence as long as possible. When people start to develop a long-term health problem, we want to focus on preventing them from developing further health and social problems. We want to see local services focused on those who have the greatest need, to reduce health inequality and to enable a greater focus on prevention of ill health.

Dying Well – People in Hartlepool are supported for a good death. Despite the fact that all of us will die one day, some of us will experience death suddenly or prematurely; others will die after a period of illness or frailty, which can sometimes be protracted over time. We want to engage our communities so that people from Hartlepool are supported to die with dignity, compassion and that relevant support is available to carers to deal with dying and death.

Hartlepool council want to support people to access community resources to prevent them needing health and social care provision. The council is implementing Community Led Support and will be commissioning future services to support this vision.

“Community Led Support seeks to change the culture and practice of community health and social work delivery so that it becomes more clearly values-driven, community focused in achieving outcomes, empowering of staff and a true partnership with local people.”

Middlesbrough Council is keen to work with its local population, providers and other stakeholders to deliver the most appropriate support to those in need. This position statement is intended to provide the information needed to support that effort.

The vision for adults living in Redcar and Cleveland is for a sustainable support and care system which promotes and maximises independence for as long as possible. There is recognition that effective strategic commissioning and strong relationships with providers can drive transformation to deliver this vision for Adult Social Care. 

Redcar and Cleveland’s aim is to shift investment across a continuum of support to allow more people to be helped at an earlier stage and to reduce or delay their need for continued support.

Efforts will be made to make better use of existing community assets, as well as secure funding from a range of sources and aligning resources with partners.

Approaches will include:

  • Proactive work alongside other Council departments and partners supporting communities to provide solutions which work for them to enable people to live and age well.
  • Integrated models of commissioning and delivery across health and social care.
  • Enabling providers to have more influence over design and delivery of services, whilst achieving agreed outcomes.

Redcar and Cleveland Borough Councils philosophy is to be open and transparent with the local community, stakeholders and all contracted providers. By being inclusive with all parties, this allows the Council to have open discussions and clear direction when setting up services.

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Historically, local authorities have always analysed data to determine their commissioning priorities based on the needs of the local population. This section exposes much of that data to allow anyone to interrogate and analyse it.

Population data in this section comes from the Office for National Statistics for ages 15 and above and from published external research. It is anticipated that data from local systems will be integrated in due course to provide additional local prevalence rates.

The Hartlepool population of people over 65 is expected to rise between 2020 and 2035 by approximately 35%, while the number of 18-64 year olds will reduce by approximately 7%.  The biggest increase is within people aged 90+, which is predicted to increase significantly by approximately 63%.

Within the over 65 population, it is anticipated there will be increases in the number of people with depression (from 1,500 to 2,000 people), people living  with dementia (from 1,200 to 1,800) and hospital admissions due to falls (from 600 to 8) during  the same period.

Hartlepool has a relatively small number of residents from black and minority ethnic groups, around 2% of the population. 

Within the Hartlepool area, there are significant numbers of people with a long term illness or disability that are well above national averages.

To give an overview of Hartlepool, please take a look at the diagram of If Hartlepool was a village of 100 people (PDF - opens in a new window).

Historically, local authorities have always analysed data to determine their commissioning priorities based on the needs of the local population. This section exposes much of that data to allow anyone to interrogate and analyse it.

Data in this section comes from the Office for National Statistics and from published external research. It is anticipated that data from local systems will be integrated in due course to provide additional local prevalence rates.

The borough of Redcar & Cleveland is one of contrasts, with outstanding natural landscapes, an industrial heritage alongside a diverse mix of towns and villages across urban, coastal and rural areas.  We are geographically the largest borough in the Tees Valley and we have it’s second highest population of approx. 137,150 residents.

In the past commissioning priorities have been determined from the analysis of data, to meet the needs of our residents. This section provides data for analysis and interrogation. The Data in this section comes from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and from published external research. It is anticipated that data from local systems will be integrated in due course to provide additional local prevalence rates.

Market Overview Header

The Care Act 2014 places a statutory duty on the Council to provide care and support for people with assessed eligible needs. The Act also places a duty on the Council to maintain an efficient and effective care market to meet the needs of the residents within the borough.

 Nationally there is a drive to focus on prevention, personalisation and outcome focused interventions to support people to remain in their own homes and within Darlington we are committed to supporting people to be as independent as possible by:

  • Developing paid work opportunities
  • Working from a strength based perspective
  • Developing Individual Service Funds
  • Preventing and delaying the reliance on residential care by offering community based alternatives
  • Supporting people to connect with their communities and have their needs met through social capital
  • Making effective use of assistive technology
  • A focus on meeting outcomes.

There is a vibrant care and support sector within Darlington, but the successful implementation of the ongoing ambitious transformation programme being implemented across Adult Services will rely on continued innovative joint working with individuals and their families and carers, partners in the public sector, in businesses, in the voluntary sector, and in our communities.

The Council, as a strategic commissioner of services, wishes to forge a new relationship with partners to benefit all who need care and support in Darlington.  By continuing to stimulate and develop a strong local market that is diverse and delivers quality and cost-effective services, people can be offered a real choice of personalised care and support, thereby enhancing individual and community independence.

Hartlepool Borough council provides and commissions a range of services to people with eligible social care needs including older people, adults with learning disabilities or physical disabilities, people with mental health needs, adults with substance misuse issues and carers. 

Services include information & advice, day services, home care, extra care housing, supported living 24hr residential and nursing careDirect Payments, home equipment and adaptations.  Support to carers is a key priority within Hartlepool, as well as assistive technology and a range of other community based services. 

Adult Services work with a range of providers and partner organisations to deliver services that meet the needs of the Hartlepool population.

Local authorities have a duty under the Care Act to monitor and manage their local markets. Historically, this has always been achieved through contract management and engagement with providers, clients, families and external agencies. Whilst this continues, the growth in data an analytical capabilities make it easier than ever to review utilisation (activity), quality, capacity and the location of services.

This section provides more detail on each of these measures. There are  a range of filters to allow users to fully explore what is known about the local area.

Under the Care Act 2014 the council has a statutory duty to provide care and support for people with eligible needs. The Act also places a duty on the council to maintain an efficient and effective care market to meet the needs of the residents in Redcar & Cleveland. Nationally there is a drive to focus on prevention, personalisation and outcome focused interventions. The growth in choice and control will mean that we need to ensure a diverse market delivering quality and cost-effective services. The provision of enablement services and community based alternatives to residential care that help people to remain within their own home is a government expectation. This, along with increased life expectancies, means people will be going into residential and nursing care later in their lives but with increased complexity of needs. Organisations across all sectors will need to provide personalised care and support at all levels with the ultimate aim of preventing or delaying the need for care home or hospital admissions. The market will need to respond to this demand innovatively with new ideas and ways of working.

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In Darlington, we strive to engage with our stakeholders whenever possible. It is the views of our partners in health, commissioned providers, the third sector and also neighbouring local authorities which will assist us to develop our future plans.

We also seek feedback from people directly in receipt of current services and these views are an integral part of all service reviews. In this way we can be assured that the support which we commission is being delivered effectively and is achieving the required outcomes.

We work closely with our commissioned Healthwatch provider and use the information gathered from service users as part of their “Enter and View” visits and themed enquiries to help deliver future service improvements.

We are continually gathering intelligence to support our commissioning plans and therefore it should be noted that this is very much “a work in progress”, which will be reviewed annually and enhanced as we further our understanding of the data available and market intelligence that we gather.

Hartlepool Borough Council is committed to commissioning services that meet the needs of the local population.  In order to ensure that we understand how to meet these needs, we work closely with all of our stakeholders, including:-

Social care workers who ensure that the views of people who use services inform how needs are met.  This information is shared across the department to ensure that the right services are commissioned.

Making Safeguarding Personal (MSP) which gathers the individual views of people receiving services who have been safeguarded.

As part of our quality audit of social work practice, senior managers undertake case file audits with social workersincluding observing social work practice and speaking to people who use services to ensure that services meet their needs.

We work closely with our partners to collaboratively develop services to meet these needs, as well as develop innovative solutions, address gaps in provision,  that encourage people to direct their own care and support.

We work closely with:

Local care providers, including regular Care Home Manager forums.

Charities and the voluntary sector.

Health colleagues, including NHS Foundation Trusts, Clinical Commissioning Group,Primary Care Networks (PCNs) and GPs.

We have a Quality Standards Framework (QSF) in place to work with our providers to monitor and support providers to meet care standards.

Complaints and compliments are collated, including an annual report that looks at themes, lesson learned and gaps in service provision.

Regular surveys are undertaken involving peple who use services and carer, that indicate very good and consistent performance.

‘Working together for change’ brings together providers, professionals, service users, voluntary and community sector, family carers to look at specific areas and what works, what doesn’t work and helps inform service design and future commissioning.

We run a series of family leaderships courses which brings people together across specific areas, such as dementia, to empower them to have a voice in service design and delivery, some of whom have gone on to sit on commissioning panels.

Other groups such as the Learning Disability Partnership Board, Mental Health Forum, Voice for You, are all consulted about service delivery and proposed changes.

We work closely with Healthwatch who play an important role in the work of Adult Services, and feedback from their investigations and visits influences service development and future planning.

It is essential to quantify and meet the needs of the local population, this can be partly achieved by understanding the market in terms of quality, capacity and location – however, it is equally important to know how people feel about the support they receive.

This section takes data from national surveys of service users and carers. It paints a picture of what is working well and areas where improvements could be made. 

Consultation is not only important when developing new services, it is essential to obtain feedback from people directly in receipt of current services. Direct experiences by these individuals can help commissioners identify if services are being delivered correctly and meeting individual need. Large amounts of information can be gathered through general contracting processes and monitoring but the service user experience is an essential tool in service development.

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Our commissioning intentions have been focused on changing behaviours to promote independence, developing evidence-based early interventions to prevent peoples’ care needs increasing, and devising new delivery models through joint work with our partners.

 We gather data and feedback from a wide range of sources and analyse this in conjunction with predicted demand models to determine the requirements for future service provision.

 We have a particular focus on using available resources more effectively and seek to work with a more diverse range of partners including voluntary and community sector organisations, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), and entrepreneurs to deliver high quality support for our residents.

The current Coronavirus pandemic has had and will continue to have for some time, a significant effect upon both the provider market and the demand for support.  As such we are continuing to monitor the situation closely to understand what this means for our current commissioning plans and to engage with our providers and stakeholders to ensure that we maintain a stable market in these unprecedented times.

Where necessary we will revise our commissioning plans and re model services to ensure that we continue to meet needs of Darlington residents in the “new normal” 

We acknowledge that developing long term commissioning intentions in this time of a Covid pandemic is challenging.  However, our focus over the next 3 years will be to further implement Community Led Support  This will offer opportunities to commission in a different way to meet the needs of the local population, both in terms of prevention and ongoing support.  Our aims are that:

- Co-production brings people and organisations together around a shared vision;

- There is a focus on communities and each will be different;

- People can get support and advice when they need it so that crises are prevented;

- The culture becomes based on trust and empowerment;

- People are treated as equals, their strengths and gifts built on;

- Bureaucracy is the absolute minimum it has to be; and

- The system is responsive, proportionate and delivers good outcomes.

Ordinarily, Commissioners would devise a list of commissioning intentions based on historical activity, future projections, local and national policy frameworks and the whole range of other information available.

Whilst this work continues, the current Corona Virus pandemic has created significant change in the markets and historical data does not necessarily fully inform us of what the future will be. Middlesbrough Council is therefore keen to hear the views of providers and other stakeholders on what they think the future should look like.

More information on how to contact the Commissioning and Procurement Team can be found in the Procurement section, alternatively, please email: contractandcommissioningunit@middlesbrough.gov.uk.

To inform future Commission intentions, data from a variety of sources is regularly reviewed and analysed, to determine local need.

Redcar and Cleveland's commissioning intentions are increasingly being affected by the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. Previously agreed intentions may now be subject to review as we cannot accurately predict the future market based on the significant effect on services, directly related to the Corona virus. These changes will no doubt re model the way future services are aligned, and consultations will be required to ensure the Council develop the right services to meet the needs and demands within the Borough.

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 Social Care is funded from taxpayers, via allocations from Central Government and also from contributions to services from some individuals. As such local authorities have a responsibility to ensure that all income is utilised to deliver services which are both cost effective and efficient. Darlington Borough Council does this by ensuring that services are regularly monitored and reviewed and are able to clearly demonstrate Value for Money (VFM).

Demand from both an increasing ageing population and individuals with complex needs places significant challenges on the Council to meet this demand from within existing resources. This will only be achieved by demand management, strengths-based assessments, and service redesign.

 This section provides further detail on how Darlington has spent its adult social care budget over recent years. The expenditure data can be broken down using filters by Age Groups, Service types and Primary Support Reasons.

Adult Social Care is funded through council budgets that are reviewed regularly to focus on priority spend areas, with those priorities based on the commissioning intentions highlighted earlier.

Budgets continue to be a challenge, however, the council continues to prioritise services for vulnerable people.

We would encourage providers coming into this marker to provide innovative and collaborative solutions to meet our residents needs in imaginative, safe and effective ways.

The council’s medium term financial strategy is provided here.  This tool provides an analysis of spend over the previous 5 years, including breakdowns across service types.

Local authorities are funded by the taxpayer, they receive income from services they deliver and have a duty to ensure that any income is spent in the most beneficial way for the local population.

This section provides further detail on how Middlesbrough has spent its social care budget over recent years.

RCBC is Public Funded from taxpayers, via the Government, as such we have a responsibility to ensure that all income is utilised to deliver services effectively and efficiently, by exercising the principles of Value for Money (VFM), on behalf of the public.

The demand from a rising population of older people requires significant improvement in efficiency and service re-design to respond to need within available resources. To be in line with the actual resources which are likely to be available over the next five years the distribution of spend, along with demand, needs to be managed differently.

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More information on Commissioning and Procurement (including contact details) for Darlington Borough Council can be found on our website:

https://www.darlington.gov.uk/business-and-licensing/doing-business-with-the-council/

Procurement information and Hartlepool Borough Council’s Contracts register can be found on the web site at the following location:

https://www.hartlepool.gov.uk/procurement

For any queries on procurement, commissioning or contracts related to Adult Social Care, please email your question to the address below:

Adultcommissioning@hartlepool.gov.uk   

More information on Commissioning and Procurement (including contact details) for Middlesbrough Council can be found on our website: https://www.middlesbrough.gov.uk/business/commissioning-and-procurement

More information on Commissioning and Procurement (including contact details) for Redcar & Cleveland borough Council can be found at:

https://www.redcar-cleveland.gov.uk/business/business-with-us/Pages/Introduction-to-Council-Procurement.aspx


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